The Jennerosity Appeal

Help us to raise £20,000 this year

Whilst we don’t know where exactly Jenner carried out his first vaccination in 1796, it was from this house in Berkeley that he wrote up his findings and told the world about his discovery. Less than 200 years later, smallpox had been eradicated, the first and only human disease to be completely wiped out. All thanks to the work of Jenner.

In 1985, after an international appeal prompted a number of generous donations, Jenner’s home was opened to the public as a memorial to his achievements and to promote the practice of vaccination. Visitors today can glimpse an insight into Jenner’s character and personality through displays of objects and a recreation of his Study, they can see the Temple of Vaccinia, where Jenner vaccinated the people of Berkeley free of charge, and they can relax in Jenner’s garden.

Now, 31 years on we are launching a new appeal to try and raise £20,000 to secure our future. Museums and, subsequently, visitor expectations have changed and our displays do not always tell this remarkable story in the most accessible way. The historic fabric of the building is also at risk as renovation work carried out in the early 1980s is now understood to have actually harmed, rather than helped, the structure. The work required is substantial and will require significant capital grants and donations, however we need your support before then. By donating to our Jennerosity Appeal, you will help us to keep the museum open during this transitional period and allow us the time to put in applications for these all-important larger grants.

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Physic Garden Launch

After six months of work by the museum’s dedicated team of garden volunteers, we are almost ready to launch our brand new Physic Garden!

Based on similar Physic Gardens in London, Oxford and Cowbridge, the design of the garden is based around the traditional understanding of the body’s four humours and each bed contains plants which were said to heal a different part of the body. Edward Jenner was a keen gardener and this is the first stage in reintroducing plants that he might have used and grown himself to the historic garden. All of this has only been made possible with the support of public funding from the Arts Council England Museum Resilience Fund and a grant from the Stanley Smith Horticultural Trust, plus the hard-work and dedication of the museum’s gardening volunteers.

Want to join us for the launch? Visit on Monday 6 June at 2:30pm to see Jane Fearnley-Whittingstall officially open the garden.

You can find our more about the Physic Garden here.